RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Mickey Mouse

February 11

February 11, 2011 – Mickey’s Toontown Fair Closes in Walt Disney World

On February 11, 2011, the Mickey’s Toontown Fair area closed in Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom Park. The area originally opened on June 18, 1988 as Mickey’s Birthdayland, which was created to celebrate Mickey’s 60th birthday; after the birthday celebrations were over, it became Mickey’s Starland on May 26, 1990, and then became Mickey’s Toontown Fair on June 29, 1996. The area featured Disney character-related attractions, such as Mickey’s Country House; Minnie’s Country House; Donald’s Boat; and The Barnstomer, a Goofy-themed rollercoaster. The area was closed due to the expansion of Fantasyland, and was eventually replaced by the Storybook Circus area; however, the area reused The Barnstormer attraction, which was retooled to fit the circus theme of the area.

Advertisements

January 10

January 10, 1932 – The First Mickey Mouse Sunday Comic is Printed

“Here’s something you’ve never seen before – something new under the old overworked sun – MICKEY MOUSE in a full page color comic!”

On January 10, 1932, the first color Sunday comic of the Miceky Mouse series premiered in newspapers across the United States. The Mickey Mouse comics burst on the scene on January 13, 1930, and became a smash hit almost overnight. The comic syndicate King Features had been eager to feature a full-page color comic, but artist Floyd Gottfredson and inker Earl Duvall hadn’t had the time to devote to such an ambitious undertaking. Once Gottfredson and Duvall had Al Taliaferro and Ted Osborne on their team, the team then had time to bring the color comic to fruition. The appeal of the color comics is interesting to note, as at that time, Mickey’s appearance on the silver screen was still black and white (Mickey’s first color cartoon wouldn’t be until 1935’s The Band Concert). The first color comic was done by completely by Duvall, trying to mimic the slapstick that had worked so well in the short films; Gottfredson would take over soon after. The pair were able to create a new kind of gag strip storytelling through their adaptation of Mickey Mouse short films and the creation of new stories.

January 2

January 2, 1938 – The First Episode of the Mickey Mouse Theater of the Air Airs

“Who’s afraid of ra-di-o, ra-di-o, ra-di-o?”

On January 2, 1938, the first episode of the radio program Mickey Mouse Theater of the Air aired on NBC. It was a musical-variety series aimed at children, and was sponsored by Pepsodent. The program was created to promote the upcoming full-length feature animation film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and featured Walt Disney as the voice of Mickey Mouse, Clarence Nash as Donald Duck, Thelma Boardman as Minnie Mouse, Stuart Buchanan as Goofy, and Florence Gill as Clarabelle Cow. Each episode featured the characters in a different story, with the first story featuring the tale of Robin Hood. The twentieth, and final, episode aired on May 15th.

December 4

December 4, 1998 – A Steiff Mickey Mouse Doll Sells for $7,261 at Christie’s Auction

On December 4, 1998, Christie’s Auction House held a teddy bear themed auction at their auction house in London, South Kensington. At this auction, a rare 1930s Steiff Mickey Mouse doll was listed on the block, estimated to sell between £2,000 and £3,000 (around $3,323 to $4,985 at the time; around $5,127 to $7,691, adjusted for 2018 inflation). The doll would end up selling for £4,370 ($7,261; around $11,203 adjusted for 2018 inflation). Steiff had been creating teddy bears and specialty dolls since 1880, and was asked by Walt Disney to help create what would become an iconic Mickey Mouse doll.

November 21

November 21, 1978 – The Library of Congress Holds the Exhibit Building a Better Mouse

“…a ground-breaking popular culture exhibition on display at the Library…”

On November 21, 1978, the exhibition Building a Better Mouse kicked off at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Running until January 30, 1979, the exhibit celebrated Mickey Mouse’s 50th birthday as well as “fifty years of animation,” as it was advertised. It was curated by animation historian J. Michael Barrier, and featured over 120 items, ranging from production art, to merchandise, to books; these items were from a variety of sources, including the Disney Archives and materials already in the hands of the Library of Congress.

September 26

September 26, 1947 – The Character Eega Beeva First Appears in the Mickey Mouse Comics

               Image courtesy of D23

“We can use my interdimensional travel ring to go watch!”

On September 26, 1947, the character Eega Beeva, known as a “highly evolved human,” made his first appearance in the Mickey Mouse comic strip; he was featured in the storyline Mickey Mouse and the Man from Tomorrow. He was originally proposed to premiere in a 1947 ad campaign which tried to introduce the character on Mickey’s twentieth anniversary (although this was erroneous, as Mickey was first introduced in 1928), but was simply introduced as part of a new storyline. Eega’s real name is Pittisborum Psercy Pystachi Pseter Psersimmon Plummer-Push, and he was a tech guru from 2447 that accidentally stumbled into Mickey’s era and life. He was created by Bill Walsh and Floyd Gottfredson, and they completed working on his story until 1950. Although he’s considered a rare character in the American comics, Eega Beeva found great success in Italy, and ended up starring in his own comic; his backstory changed, however, as they claimed he was from 2000 and was an alien.

August 19

August 19, 2011 – Rock Star Mickey is Unveiled at the D23 Expo

“It’s great to see how Rock Star Mickey can get kids rockin’ at an early age.” – Constantine Maroulis

On August 19, 2011, representatives from Fisher-Price and Disney Consumer Products, along with former American Idol finalist Constantine Maroulis, and Mickey Mouse, were on hand at the D23 Expo to present the new Rock Star Mickey interactive plush toy. The toy, a sequel to the previous year’s Dance Star Mickey, features Mickey performing specialty rock moves, including the “Mickety-Split,” where he performs a split while playing the guitar with his nose. Mickey also performs a version of the classic rock song “You Really Got Me.” It was also announced at the event that the toy would be available at retailers nationwide starting September 6, and would retail for $54.99. Maroulis entertained crowds and performed with Mickey to promote the toy, while representatives showed the toy’s dance moves and answered questions.