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Tag Archives: Walt Disney

September 16

September 16, 1918 – Walt Disney is Accepted for the Red Cross

On September 16, 1918, Walt Disney was officially accepted into the Red Cross for service during World War I. Disney’s brothers were serving in the Army and Navy, and while Walt wanted to serve, he was too young to do so, being only 16. However, after finding out that the Red Cross accepted people as young as 17, he forged his application to make it appear he was of age. After acceptance, Walt attended training in Sound Beach, Connecticut, and was sent to France, stationed in St. Cyr. Walt was originally assigned to drive ambulances for the Evacuation Hospital No. 5, but was later assigned to a motor pool. Walt officially ended his service in September, 1919.

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March 10

March 10, 1935 – The New York Times Publishes Article: “Mickey Mouse Emerges as Economist”

“One touch of Mickey makes the whole world grin in a very dark hour.”

On March 10, 1935, the New York Times ran an article entitled “Mickey Mouse Emerges as Economist,” with the tagline about how the phenomenal popularity of the character led to “victories in the field of business man and banker.” The article not only spoke to his appeal in the entertainment field across the world, but to the business side as well, especially calling out marketing genius Kay Kamen. The article also featured a picture of Walt Disney, a plush Mickey Mouse, and a mountain of fanmail.

 

February 27

February 27, 1942 – The Daily Variety Runs Article “Walt Disney Weeps as He Gets Oscar”

“I want to thank everybody here. This is a vote of confidence from the whole industry.”

On February 27, 1942, the Daily Variety ran an article entitled “Walt Disney Weeps as He Gets Oscar,” recounting how Disney received the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award the night before at the Academy Awards. The award itself is not an annual award, but awarded periodically to those individuals that brought high quality work to the motion picture industry. Disney was the fourth person to win the award, and he was emotional upon winning, as this seemed to be validation from the film industry for his then-relatively small body of work in animation (which included short films and only four animated feature films: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Pinocchio, Fantasia, and Dumbo). This award was particularly special for Disney, as the film Fantasia had not done as well as hoped at the box office, and while Disney called it “a [mistake] but it was an honest one,” he was still lauded by the presenter as presenting a new and novel way to educate the public about classical music. Thalberg’s widow Norma Shearer was at the ceremony and gave Disney a kiss after he returned to his seat.

December 23

December 23, 1966 – TIME Magazine Releases the Article “Walt Disney: Images of Innocence”

“Disney was dead, but not his vision of innocence, nor the dreams he made.”

On December 23, 1966, the newest issue of TIME Magazine was released, featuring an article about Walt Disney. This article was released a little over a week since Disney passed from lung cancer, and spoke to his impact on the world through his optimism and innocence that shone through his works. There is a quick summation of his successes, ranging from Mickey Mouse to the True-Life Adventures, while noting that critics had an issue with Disney being unable to “accept the end of innocence.” However, the article ends with the hope that Disney provided through his life, and how it still exists through the multitude of areas he worked, including Disneyland.

December 5

December 5, 1985 – The Skyfest Celebration is Held in Anaheim, California

“A million balloon salute to honor Walt Disney and Disneyland’s 30th year.”

On December 5, 1985, to honor Walt Disney’s birthday, the residents of Anaheim celebrated with a special event known as Skyfest. The event featured a release of 1,000,000 balloons, and seven thousand pounds of helium were used to send the balloons skybound. The event not only honored what would have been Walt Disney’s 84th birthday, but also the 30th anniversary of Walt’s dream, Disneyland. This event also set a world record, beating the previous record of 384,800 balloons.

October 23

October 23, 1954 – Walt Disney Appears on the Cover of TV Guide

“Disney in TV Land: The old maestro is trying to top a fabulous career.”

On October 23, 1954, Walt Disney appeared on the front cover of TV Guide, alongside Goofy, Mickey, Pluto, Donald, and Dopey. The picture was meant to describe the featured article: “Why Disney Changed His Mind About TV,” which was all about Walt Disney’s newest show, Disneyland, which would be the first incarnation of the long-running anthology series. The article featured exclusive sketches of what would become Disneyland, and explained why Disney finally took the plunge and entered the realm of television.

June 24

June 24, 1938 – Walt Disney Appears on Cover of Family Circle

“Walt Disney talks, mostly of his animals, and the author learns new facts about them.”

On June 24, 1938, Walt Disney graced the cover of The Family Circle magazine. Following the success of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Walt is interviewed about the success of the film and the characters he’s created, ranging from Mickey Mouse to characters from the successful Silly Symphonies series of short films. The cover of the magazine featured a smiling Walt surrounded by images of Donald Duck.