RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Disneyland Park

March 24

March 24, 1972 – The Country Bear Jamboree Opens in Disneyland

“Have a knee-slappin’ good time at Country Bear Jamboree!”

On March 24, 1972, the Audio-Animatronic attraction Country Bear Jamboree opened in Disneyland’s Bear Country (now Critter Country). Based on the original Walt Disney World attraction that opened in 1971, the attraction features 18 bears singing and dancing in a country-music themed show. The attraction had been planned since the 1960s, as it was originally intended to be part of the Mineral King Ski Resort. The Disneyland attraction was renamed the Country Bear Playhouse in 1986, but was eventually closed on September 9, 2001; it was replaced with the new Winnie the Pooh attraction.

March 21

March 21, 1975 – The Mission to Mars Attraction Opens in Disneyland

“Welcome to Mission Control, space travelers.”

On March 21, 1975, the Mission to Mars attraction opened in Disneyland’s Tomorrowland. An updated version of the Flight to the Moon attraction was required after Americans landed on the moon in 1969, rendering it as obsolescent. The solution was to change the destination to Mars, incorporating clips from the Disneyland anthology episode “Mars and Beyond” from 1957 to give guests an idea of what they could expect from a trip to the red planet. A version of this attraction opened in Walt Disney World on June7, 1975, closing on October 4, 1993. The Disneyland version would itself go on to close on November 2, 1992.

March 15

March 15, 1927 – Former President of Disneyland and Disney Legend Jack Lindquist is Born

“Jack is Jack, no matter where he is or what he is doing. He respects people. He goes out of his way not to be set up on a pedestal.” – Former Executive Vice President of Disneyland Ron Dominquez

On March 15, 1927, Jack Lindquist was born in Chicago, Illinois; he and his family moved to Los Angeles, California when he was four, where he went on to be a child actor. After graduating from the Hollywood High School, he served two years with the United States Air Force before attending the University of Southern California. Lindquist began his career in marketing and advertising, and in 1955, while working as a consultant for a corporate sponsor of what would become Disneyland, he became enamored with the place, and found himself working for Disney a month later. In 1965, Lindquist rose up the corporate ladder after being named the director of marketing, and continued his climb after his work marketing Walt Disney World. In 1972, he was named the Vice President of Marketing for Disneyland and Walt Disney World, but his climb didn’t slow from there: in 1976 he was named Vice President of Marketing for Walt Disney Attractions, followed by another promotion in 1982 to Executive Vice President of Marketing and Entertainment for Disney’s Outdoor Recreation Activities. After setting up the marketing division for Tokyo Disneyland, Lindquist continued to develop promotional ideas for all Disney parks, and in 1990, he was named the President of Disneyland. His legacy during his tenure continues to be felt in several Disneyland areas, including Disney’s California Adventure, as he lobbied for the development of the second park. On November 18, 1993, Lindquist retired after nearly 40 years with the company. He was honored with a window on Main Street a month later, naming him the “Honorary Mayor of Disneyland.” He was honored as a Disney Legend in 1994. Lindquist passed away at the age of 88 on February 28, 2016.

February 19

February 19, 2010 – Official Reopening Date for Captain EO in Disneyland Announced

ceo_return

“Today, we are excited to give you an update on the Captain’s return!”

On February 19, 2010, the official reopening date for the Captain EO attraction was announced by Disney Parks, with the official date being February 23, 2010. The film was originally announced in late 2009 to be returning to Disneyland, but with no firm date set; more information about the release was announced in the February update. The film would return to the Tomorrowland Theatre with an updated 70mm print, along with acoustic updates that were made to the theatre since the film’s last showing in 1997.

February 16

February 16, 2000 – The Disneyland 45 Years of Magic Parade Premieres

45yomp

“To find inspiration for this special parade, we literally searched the stars. We looked to the stars of our most loved films.” – Jean Luc Choplin, Vice President, Creative Development

On February 16, 2000, the 45 Years of Magic Parade kicked off in Disneyland. Celebrating the park’s 45th anniversary, the parade featured characters from classic Disney films, such as Disney princesses Cinderella and Aurora, as well as several sections featuring elements from the movies Fantasia and Fantasia 2000. The parade also featured heavy cloud imagery, and a new feature of “audience participation,” where up to 45 spectators were invited to wear tutus and hats and dance during the parade. Originally the music to accompany the parade was Sir Edward Elgar’s “Pomp and Circumstance,” but after a rather lukewarm reception from guests, the music was changed to a more upbeat Disney medley.

January 30

January 30, 1971 – Disneyland Hosts Two-Day Alice in Wonderland Days Event

aiwd_d

“Meet Alice, the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, and the Walrus and pose for pictures with them at Alpine Gardens…”

On January 30, 1971, Disneyland hosted the two-day event Alice in Wonderland Days. The event was a celebration of all things Alice in Wonderland, complete with two parades that traveled from Main Street U.S.A. to the it’s a small world attraction in Fantasyland. Special photo ops were also available with characters Alice, the Mad Hatter, the White Rabbit, and the Walrus, held in the Alpine Gardens area between Tomorrowland and Sleeping Beauty Castle.

January 18

January 18, 1958 – The Pet Boarding Facility Ken-L-Land Opens

ken-l-land

“‘Man’s best friend’ has not been forgotten when the family visits Disneyland, thanks to Ken-L-Ration’s deluxe Pet Motel, Ken-L-Land.”

On January 18, 1958, the pet boarding facility Ken-L-Land opened just outside the Disneyland main gate. It was a place where families, who had traveled miles to get to Disneyland, could leave their pets rather than leave them in the parking lot. Sponsored by Ken-L-Ration dog food from the Quaker Oats Company, pets were fed exclusively from the brand, with a full day’s boarding and a can of food costing 25 cents. Ken-L-Ration’s sponsorship lasted until 1967; the sponsorship and name of the kennel changed over the years, including sponsorship by Kal Kan with the name change to Kennel Club in 1968 to 1977, sponsorship by Gaines with name change to Pet Care Kennel in 1986 to 1991, and sponsorship by Nestle’s Purina in 1993, with the name change to Disneyland Kennel Club.