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Tag Archives: 1960s

October 6

October 6, 1968 – The Disney Anthology Episode “Pacifically Peeking” Premieres on Television

“You know, a book be like a ship: it can take ye to places you’ve never seen before.”

On October 6, 1968, the episode of the Disney Anthology, entitled “Pacifically Peeking,” premiered on NBC. It was directed by Ward Kimball and Hamilton Luske, with story by Bill Berg, narration by Mel Leven, and featured Paul Frees as the voice of Moby Duck, the author of the titular book. Moby Duck takes viewers on a cruise of the Pacific Ocean, with the episode bringing together animation and education.

September 15

September 15, 1967 – LIFE Magazine Publishes Article on Pirates of the Caribbean

“The Disneyland cutthroats are a brawling band of computerized robots that look and move about like real people but lack even the spark of human decency that pirates are supposed to have had.”

On September 15, 1967, an article in the issue of LIFE Magazine covering the Pirates of the Caribbean attraction was released. Entitled “Anyone for Yo-ho-ho?,” the article featured pictures of the audio-animatronic pirates (and the jail guard dog), with an explanation of how the attraction came to be, as well as an explanation of audio-animatronics.

August 31

August 31, 1964 – The Dapper Dans Sing at Anaheim Stadium Groundbreaking

“Let me root, root, root for the home team, if they don’t win it’s a shame.”

On August 31, 1964, the ground-breaking ceremony for the new Anaheim Stadium was held, with the Disneyland Dapper Dans singing “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” in front of 4,000 guests and visiting dignitaries in an event known as the “Biggest Moment in Orange County Sports History.” The $24 million stadium is located just a few miles from Disneyland, and would be home for the eventually Disney-owned team the Anaheim Angels. The stadium was completed in 1966.

August 28

August 28, 1966 – The 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Exhibit Closes in Disneyland

Image Credit: Vulcaniasubmarine.com

On August 28, 1966, the 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Exhibit closed in Disneyland’s Tomorrowland area. Originally opening on August 3, 1955, the attraction came about by accident: as the opening day for Disneyland drew near, Walt Disney realized that he’d fallen behind schedule on Tomorrowland. The film on which the exhibit was based had been immensely popular with audiences, so it was decided that the sets from the film would be used for a walkthrough attraction. Meant to be a temporary attraction, it proved to be so popular that it lasted for 11 years. It would resurface again in 1989, when the sets were brought out at the Disney-MGM Studios in Florida; the attraction proved once again to be popular, and inspired the build for the Disneyland Paris attraction Les Mystères du Nautilus, opening in 1994.

August 10

August 10, 1960 – The True-Life Adventure Jungle Cat is Generally Released

“[The jungle cat’s] secret domain is the scene of our True-Life Adventure, and its predatory habits our theme, for this is the story of the greatest hunter of them all.”

On August 10, 1960, the final True-Life Adventure documentary was generally released to theaters, after having an initial release on December 16, 1959. Directed by James Algar, the film explores the story of the South American jaguar as narrated by Winston Hibler. A pair of jaguars start a family, fight off their natural enemies (such as a crocodile and a boa constrictor), and hunt for food in the South American jungle.

March 27

March 27, 1961 – The Snow White Grotto Opens in Disneyland

“Nestled amid the greenery near Sleeping Beauty Castle, the lovely little water wonderland adorned with handcrafted figures of Snow White, Doc, Dopey, Bashful, Sleepy, Happy, Grumpy and Dopey…”

On March 27, 1961, the Snow White Grotto area opened in Disneyland, just outside of Sleeping Beauty Castle. The grotto came about due to a collection of marble sculptures that Walt had ordered from Italy, and Imagineer John Hench was asked to create an area to display them. Hench was dismayed, however, to find that Snow White and the dwarfs were the same size (this sizing issue apparently was traced back to a package of Snow White gift soaps, from which the models were based, which featured the characters all the same size), and used “forced perspective” to make it appear that Snow White was larger than the dwarfs. The marble statues have since been replaced by fiberglass statues after the marble became discolored through the years. The area also features a wishing well, where guests can throw coins and make their wish, with the proceeds donated to charity. In 1983, the original voice of Snow White, Adriana Castelotti, was asked to come in and rerecord “I’m Wishing” for the New Fantasyland opening. The song is heard over the waterfall and echoing back from the well.

March 23

March 23, 1967 – The Special Cartoon Scrooge McDuck and Money is Released

“It’s gotta circulate, circulate, come out of the woods; stimulate, motivate, service and goods. It’s no nest egg to incubate, money’s got to circulate!”

On March 23, 1967, the special short film Scrooge McDuck and Money premiered. It was the first film appearance of the popular comic book character. It was written by Bill Berg, directed by Hamilton Luske, and featured veteran voice actor Bill Thompson as Scrooge McDuck.

The short begins with Scrooge in his vault, singing to his money. Huey, Dewey, and Louie watch on as he starts to embrace the coins, and they share with him their piggy bank, as they have saved up $1.95. Scrooge asks them what they plan on doing with the money, and they ask him to save it for them so they can be as rich as he. While he is willing to help them save, he tells them that they need to learn more about money itself. He begins with the history of money, starting with how Roman soldiers were paid with salt. They then see an old dubloon to learn about the history of “bits” before moving to Greek obals: coins so tiny they were carried in the mouth. Scrooge then explains that there was a time where money was nonexistent, and a musical number is used to explain how money came to be. The boys wonder why a few billion can’t be printed, which concerns Scrooge, as the term “billion” is thrown around so casually; if there isn’t anything to back up the money printed, then inflation occurs. Scrooge then explains to the boys about economics and budgeting, before going into income taxes. He convinces the boys to make a sound investment to get their money to work. He gets them to invest in his company, but doesn’t hesitate to charge them a “three-cent fee” for his advisement.