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Tag Archives: 1960s

March 27

March 27, 1961 – The Snow White Grotto Opens in Disneyland

“Nestled amid the greenery near Sleeping Beauty Castle, the lovely little water wonderland adorned with handcrafted figures of Snow White, Doc, Dopey, Bashful, Sleepy, Happy, Grumpy and Dopey…”

On March 27, 1961, the Snow White Grotto area opened in Disneyland, just outside of Sleeping Beauty Castle. The grotto came about due to a collection of marble sculptures that Walt had ordered from Italy, and Imagineer John Hench was asked to create an area to display them. Hench was dismayed, however, to find that Snow White and the dwarfs were the same size (this sizing issue apparently was traced back to a package of Snow White gift soaps, from which the models were based, which featured the characters all the same size), and used “forced perspective” to make it appear that Snow White was larger than the dwarfs. The marble statues have since been replaced by fiberglass statues after the marble became discolored through the years. The area also features a wishing well, where guests can throw coins and make their wish, with the proceeds donated to charity. In 1983, the original voice of Snow White, Adriana Castelotti, was asked to come in and rerecord “I’m Wishing” for the New Fantasyland opening. The song is heard over the waterfall and echoing back from the well.

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March 23

March 23, 1967 – The Special Cartoon Scrooge McDuck and Money is Released

“It’s gotta circulate, circulate, come out of the woods; stimulate, motivate, service and goods. It’s no nest egg to incubate, money’s got to circulate!”

On March 23, 1967, the special short film Scrooge McDuck and Money premiered. It was the first film appearance of the popular comic book character. It was written by Bill Berg, directed by Hamilton Luske, and featured veteran voice actor Bill Thompson as Scrooge McDuck.

The short begins with Scrooge in his vault, singing to his money. Huey, Dewey, and Louie watch on as he starts to embrace the coins, and they share with him their piggy bank, as they have saved up $1.95. Scrooge asks them what they plan on doing with the money, and they ask him to save it for them so they can be as rich as he. While he is willing to help them save, he tells them that they need to learn more about money itself. He begins with the history of money, starting with how Roman soldiers were paid with salt. They then see an old dubloon to learn about the history of “bits” before moving to Greek obals: coins so tiny they were carried in the mouth. Scrooge then explains that there was a time where money was nonexistent, and a musical number is used to explain how money came to be. The boys wonder why a few billion can’t be printed, which concerns Scrooge, as the term “billion” is thrown around so casually; if there isn’t anything to back up the money printed, then inflation occurs. Scrooge then explains to the boys about economics and budgeting, before going into income taxes. He convinces the boys to make a sound investment to get their money to work. He gets them to invest in his company, but doesn’t hesitate to charge them a “three-cent fee” for his advisement.

March 4

March 4, 1962 – The Restaurant Don DeFore’s Silver Banjo Closes in Disneyland

“Down on New Orleans Street Over in Frontierland Near Tom Sawyer Island is Don DeFore’s Silver Banjo in Enchanting Disneyland. Finest Barbecue this side of the Mississippi!”

On March 4, 1962, the Frontierland food facility Don Defore’s Silver Banjo closed in Disneyland. Opening on June 15, 1957, the restaurant was named after the actor Don DeFore, who was best known for playing “Thorny” Thornberry on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriett and for playing George Baxter on Hazel. The facility mostly provided barbecue dishes. It was closed to allow the expansion of the Aunt Jemima Pancake House.

February 17

February 17, 1960 – The Space Station X-1 Exhibit Closes in Disneyland

“See America from Outer Space”

On February 17, 1960, the Space Station X-1 exhibit, located in Disneyland’s Tomorrowland, officially closed. One of the park’s original opening day attractions, the exhibit gave guests a view of the Earth from what was eventually called the “Satellite View of America.” This scenic painting of the Earth was created by artist Peter Ellenshaw.

December 24

December 24, 1960 – Animator Glenn McQueen is Born

“Glenn is not gone from us. He’s still alive in all of us.”

On December 24, 1960, Glenn John McQueen was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. After graduating from Sheridan College in 1985, McQueen scored a scholarship to the New York Institute of Technology Computer Graphics Lab; this lab is notable for being the top computer lab for the development of computer animated films, with several future Pixar employees having studied there. McQueen himself would become a Pixar employee in 1994, where he became an animation supervisor for the films Toy Story; A Bug’s Life; Toy Story 2; and Monsters, Inc. He was noted for his brilliance in the field of animation, with John Lasseter calling him the “heart and soul” of the animation department. Unforutnately, McQueen passed away in 2002 during the development of Finding Nemo; the film was dedicated to his memory, as was the character of Lightning McQueen from the Cars franchise. When Pixar Canada opened, it was named the Glenn McQueen Pixar Animation Center in his honor.

December 23

December 23, 1966 – TIME Magazine Releases the Article “Walt Disney: Images of Innocence”

“Disney was dead, but not his vision of innocence, nor the dreams he made.”

On December 23, 1966, the newest issue of TIME Magazine was released, featuring an article about Walt Disney. This article was released a little over a week since Disney passed from lung cancer, and spoke to his impact on the world through his optimism and innocence that shone through his works. There is a quick summation of his successes, ranging from Mickey Mouse to the True-Life Adventures, while noting that critics had an issue with Disney being unable to “accept the end of innocence.” However, the article ends with the hope that Disney provided through his life, and how it still exists through the multitude of areas he worked, including Disneyland.

June 8

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June 8, 1962 – McDonnell Douglas Begins Rocket to the Moon Attraction Sponsorship

On June 8, 1962, the aerospace manufacturer and defense contractor McDonnell Douglas took over the sponsorship of Disneyland’s Tomorrowland attraction Rocket to the Moon. McDonnell Douglas succeeded TWA, who ended their sponsorship in 1961. The sponsorship was a big deal for the company, as it had just been formed in 1967, after a merger between McDonnell Aircraft and Douglas Aircraft Company. This sponsorship ended in 1966, when the attraction would then become Flight to the Moon. McDonnell Douglas sponsored the succeeding attraction until January 5, 1975.