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Tag Archives: 1960s

December 24

December 24, 1960 – Animator Glenn McQueen is Born

“Glenn is not gone from us. He’s still alive in all of us.”

On December 24, 1960, Glenn John McQueen was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. After graduating from Sheridan College in 1985, McQueen scored a scholarship to the New York Institute of Technology Computer Graphics Lab; this lab is notable for being the top computer lab for the development of computer animated films, with several future Pixar employees having studied there. McQueen himself would become a Pixar employee in 1994, where he became an animation supervisor for the films Toy Story; A Bug’s Life; Toy Story 2; and Monsters, Inc. He was noted for his brilliance in the field of animation, with John Lasseter calling him the “heart and soul” of the animation department. Unforutnately, McQueen passed away in 2002 during the development of Finding Nemo; the film was dedicated to his memory, as was the character of Lightning McQueen from the Cars franchise. When Pixar Canada opened, it was named the Glenn McQueen Pixar Animation Center in his honor.

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December 23

December 23, 1966 – TIME Magazine Releases the Article “Walt Disney: Images of Innocence”

“Disney was dead, but not his vision of innocence, nor the dreams he made.”

On December 23, 1966, the newest issue of TIME Magazine was released, featuring an article about Walt Disney. This article was released a little over a week since Disney passed from lung cancer, and spoke to his impact on the world through his optimism and innocence that shone through his works. There is a quick summation of his successes, ranging from Mickey Mouse to the True-Life Adventures, while noting that critics had an issue with Disney being unable to “accept the end of innocence.” However, the article ends with the hope that Disney provided through his life, and how it still exists through the multitude of areas he worked, including Disneyland.

June 8

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June 8, 1962 – McDonnell Douglas Begins Rocket to the Moon Attraction Sponsorship

On June 8, 1962, the aerospace manufacturer and defense contractor McDonnell Douglas took over the sponsorship of Disneyland’s Tomorrowland attraction Rocket to the Moon. McDonnell Douglas succeeded TWA, who ended their sponsorship in 1961. The sponsorship was a big deal for the company, as it had just been formed in 1967, after a merger between McDonnell Aircraft and Douglas Aircraft Company. This sponsorship ended in 1966, when the attraction would then become Flight to the Moon. McDonnell Douglas sponsored the succeeding attraction until January 5, 1975.

June 3

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June 3, 1960 – The Puffin Bakery Closes in Disneyland

On June 3, 1960, the Puffin Bakery, located on Disneyland’s Main Street, closed. The bakery opened on July 18, 1955, and featured several types of pastries and snacks. When it closed, it was quickly replaced by the Sunkist Citrus House, which would close in 1989.

March 18

March 18, 1968 – The Partners Federal Credit Union Starts in Disneyland

“Imagine what we can do together.”

On March 18, 1968, the Partners Federal Credit Union started in Disneyland. The Walt Disney Company has a long history with creating credit unions for its employees, with the first one, the Walt Disney Employees Federal Credit Union, opening in 1945. This Disneyland federal credit union has run under several different names, including Disneyland Recreation Club (DRC) Federal Credit Union, as well as Disneyland Employees Federal Credit Union. Partners was officially founded through a merger of Disney’s other credit union, the Vista Federal Credit Union.

February 22

February 22, 1964 – The Columbia Sailing Ship Exhibit Opens

“History comes alive below deck.”

On February 22, 1964, the below decks exhibition within the Columbia Sailing Ship opened to the public. The original Disneyland ship, based on the Columbia sailing ship that circumnavigated the globe in 1787, opened in the park on June 14, 1958. The historical displays created in the ship give guests an idea of the living conditions sailors faced in the 18th century, particularly those that joined ships like the Columbia to fill in details of the world map.

February 19

February 19, 1967 – The New York Times Publishes Article About Walt Disney World

“In Mr. Disney’s words, however, the ‘most exciting and most important part’ of Disney World will be the planned community, which ‘will take its cue from the new ideas and new technologies that are now emerging from the creative centers of American industry.’”

On February 19, 1967, the New York Times published an article entitled “Florida’s Disney World Aims at ’70 Opening,” which gave the public some new insight into the highly publicized “Florida Project” which would become Walt Disney World. The article went into detail about how large the planned park would be (“bigger than Manhattan”), the planned community EPCOT, and several plans in the area to provide a suitable living space for those who will live in the community, including a drainage survey and an interchange. It estimated, based on reports from Disney executives, that the park would open in 1970; Walt Disney World would go on to open on October 1, 1971.