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Tag Archives: Color

June 17

June 17, 2016 – The Short Film Inner Workings Premieres at the Annecy Film Festival

“Do you follow your head or your heart?”

On June 17, 2016, the short film Inner Workings premiered at the Annecy Film Festival; it would eventually go on to be released alongside the animated feature film Moana. The short film looked at one man’s battle between his head and his heart, with his head wanting him to go to work, while his heart wants him to go to the beach. The short was directed by Leo Matsuda.

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March 23

March 23, 1967 – The Special Cartoon Scrooge McDuck and Money is Released

“It’s gotta circulate, circulate, come out of the woods; stimulate, motivate, service and goods. It’s no nest egg to incubate, money’s got to circulate!”

On March 23, 1967, the special short film Scrooge McDuck and Money premiered. It was the first film appearance of the popular comic book character. It was written by Bill Berg, directed by Hamilton Luske, and featured veteran voice actor Bill Thompson as Scrooge McDuck.

The short begins with Scrooge in his vault, singing to his money. Huey, Dewey, and Louie watch on as he starts to embrace the coins, and they share with him their piggy bank, as they have saved up $1.95. Scrooge asks them what they plan on doing with the money, and they ask him to save it for them so they can be as rich as he. While he is willing to help them save, he tells them that they need to learn more about money itself. He begins with the history of money, starting with how Roman soldiers were paid with salt. They then see an old dubloon to learn about the history of “bits” before moving to Greek obals: coins so tiny they were carried in the mouth. Scrooge then explains that there was a time where money was nonexistent, and a musical number is used to explain how money came to be. The boys wonder why a few billion can’t be printed, which concerns Scrooge, as the term “billion” is thrown around so casually; if there isn’t anything to back up the money printed, then inflation occurs. Scrooge then explains to the boys about economics and budgeting, before going into income taxes. He convinces the boys to make a sound investment to get their money to work. He gets them to invest in his company, but doesn’t hesitate to charge them a “three-cent fee” for his advisement.

February 25

February 25, 2010 – Alice in Wonderland Holds Royal World Premiere in London

“The long trip down the rabbit hole otherwise known as the promotional tour for Alice in Wonderland is just getting underway – check out what the stars wore to the London premiere…”

On February 25, 2010, the live action feature film Alice in Wonderland premiered at the Leicester Square Odeon cinema in central London. Though the film cast and fans were greeted by a torrential downpour, many turned out to Leicester Square to see the area transformed into Wonderland, complete with a green carpet (rather than the traditional red). Most of the stars were in attendance, including Mia Wasikowska, Johnny Depp, Anne Hathaway, and Helena Bonham Carter. The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall were on hand to see the film and greet the cast; the film also served as a fundraiser for The Prince’s Foundation for Children and the Arts. The film would go on to have its general release on March 5, 2010.

February 15

February 15, 1956 – The People & Places Featurette Sardinia is Released to Theaters

On February 15, 1956, the fifth People & Places featurette Sardinia was released to theaters. Directed by Ben Sharpsteen, the featurette takes the audience on a train ride through the area of Sardinia, an area that is considered politically a region of Italy; the featurette focuses heavily on their independence and their autonomy. The audience is able to see traditional ceremonies of the Sardinian people, including a wedding and the Ardia festival.

January 26

January 26, 1990 – The Educational Film The Brain and the Nervous System Think Science is Released

“Cerebrum here! Thinking, movement, judgement, problem solving, no problem!”

On January 26, 1990, the educational short film The Brain and the Nervous System Think Science was released as part of the Wonders of Life Series. The eleven-minute film teaches quickly about the functions of the main three parts of the brain. It was written by Jamie Simons and directed by Lina Shanklin, with animation directed by Bob Kurtz.

The film begins with a greeting by Captain Cortex in Cranium Command before he leads them on a tour of the brain, looking at the cerebrum, the cerebellum, and the brain stem in animated forms. The audience is then taken to a classroom, where a girl named Jessica is fretting over a note she has received from the principal. Her friend Fred inquires what she’s done, but she’s not sure. Another student named Sylvester grabs the note and reads it out loud, informing her that it’s not good. Their teacher comes in and begins their lesson on the brain and the nervous system. Jessica is still distracted from the note, but manages to answer questions on what the cerebrum does. Sylvester is asked about the cerebellum, but is unable to answer, and Fred throws something at him to make a point about how the cerebellum handles balance and coordination. The teacher continues with the brain stem, and then moves into how the brain works with the spinal cord. Jessica finally leaves for her meeting with the principal, her brain working on overload as she walks the hallway. The principal informs her that her project at the science fair won first place, and she will be given an award at a future assembly. She wonders if everyone will think she’s a brain, and when the principal inquires if she is, she smiles, as the pieces of her brain add, “and proud of it, too!”

January 10

January 10, 1932 – The First Mickey Mouse Sunday Comic is Printed

“Here’s something you’ve never seen before – something new under the old overworked sun – MICKEY MOUSE in a full page color comic!”

On January 10, 1932, the first color Sunday comic of the Miceky Mouse series premiered in newspapers across the United States. The Mickey Mouse comics burst on the scene on January 13, 1930, and became a smash hit almost overnight. The comic syndicate King Features had been eager to feature a full-page color comic, but artist Floyd Gottfredson and inker Earl Duvall hadn’t had the time to devote to such an ambitious undertaking. Once Gottfredson and Duvall had Al Taliaferro and Ted Osborne on their team, the team then had time to bring the color comic to fruition. The appeal of the color comics is interesting to note, as at that time, Mickey’s appearance on the silver screen was still black and white (Mickey’s first color cartoon wouldn’t be until 1935’s The Band Concert). The first color comic was done by completely by Duvall, trying to mimic the slapstick that had worked so well in the short films; Gottfredson would take over soon after. The pair were able to create a new kind of gag strip storytelling through their adaptation of Mickey Mouse short films and the creation of new stories.

December 26

December 26, 1957 – The Featurette Mars and Beyond is Released to Theaters

“In this exciting age when everyone seems to be talking about the future possibilities of space travel, there’s much speculation on what we will discover when we visit other worlds.”

On December 26, 1957, the featurette Mars and Beyond was released to theaters. Originally featured as an episode of the Disneyland anthology series Disneyland on December 4, 1957, it was directed by famed Nine Old Men animator Ward Kimball. The featurette was researched and written by Kimball, William Bosche, John Dunn, Charles Downs, and Con Pederson, and features technical advisors such as Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger, Dr. E. C. Silpher, and Dr. Wernher von Braun. Although man had not landed on the moon by 1957, this featurette took that dream beyond by exploring what would happen should man land on Mars and explore the greater universe. It featured a mix of live-action and animated sequences, with the show’s tone ranging from humorous to more serious. This theater feature was the first non-television incarnation of the episode; parts of the short were taken to create a short film called Cosmic Capers that would be released in the United Kingdom in 1979.