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Tag Archives: Color

September 3

September 3, 1990 – The Challengers Premieres on Television

On September 3, 1990, the syndicated game show The Challengers premiered on television. A joint production between Rob Greenberg Productions, Dick Clark Productions, and Disney’s Buena Vista Television. Presented by Dick Clark, the show featured three contestants – one being a returning champion – competing in a sprint round, two rounds of questions, a final challenge, and a bonus ultimate challenge. One of the things that made this show unique is the tie to current events, which necessitated the show being filmed shortly before their airdate. The show was cancelled on August 30, 1991.

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August 10

August 10, 1989 – The Educational Film Trains is Released

“Gawrsh, I was hoping to meet some of the people who work on this here railroad.”

On August 10, 1989, the second of three educational films in the Goofy’s Field Trips series, titled Trains, was released. It features Bill Farmer as the voice of Goofy.

The short begins at the Rio Grande Train Station, where two kids, Cindy and Peter, are bombarding Peter’s father with questions. Peter’s father asks the kids to wait while he buys the tickets, and as they go to sit down, they spy Goofy in the station, singing to himself. He greets them, and the three magically disappear from the station and reappear near an Amtrak train. They are greeted by the engineer, who explains his job and some logistics of the train and tracks. He then has them meet Sherry, the Chief of Onboard Services, who explains her job before she takes them aboard the train. She introduces several types of rooms, including the dining car. As Peter looks through a book, Sherry explains the different types of trains he spies in his book. She takes them to meet the conductor, who quickly explains his role before the train takes off. The kids and Goofy then are whisked away to the freight yard, where they see a variety of freight trains and meet the yard master. He points out the different kinds of freight trains, which carry different kinds of supplies. He also describes the differences of the trains of old, and the new computerized systems of the time. Afterwards, they head to the dispatch center to learn about the process of dispatching the trains, with the computers helping make sure the trains are doing what they want them to do. The kids then reappear in the main terminal, and head out to their train with Peter’s father. As they pull out of the station, they spy Goofy waving goodbye from the platform.

August 7

August 7, 1989 – The Educational Film Ships is Released

“I was hopin’ to see that big ship. I wanna learn all about ships.”

On August 7, 1989, the first of three educational films in the Goofy’s Field Trips series, titled Ships, was released. It featured Bill Farmer as the voice of Goofy.

The short begins at the Starship Atlantic, which has just begun to board. Two kids are asking a lot of questions about the ship, when they spy Goofy. Magically, the trio are whisked away to the dock, where they meet the cruise director. Brought inside, the cruise director explains her job of coordinating activities for the passengers while showing them around the ship. She also explains the names of the front, back, and sides of the ship. She then takes them to the galley to meet the ship’s cook, who explains he has to cook for over 2,000 people. They meet the captain, who shows the group the radar system, and explains how he works with the ship’s engineers. The group also learns about how the lines keep the ship in place, and how the ship will take off from the shore. The cruise director takes the group to the radio room, where the ship keeps in communication with the shore, the Coast Guard, and other important parties. The group gets a message from Mickey Mouse, telling them to check out the rest of the harbor. Magically they are whisked away to the harbor, where they meet the harbor master. The group learns about all the types of ships in the harbor, and meet the berthing officer. The kids then end up back with their family, and board the ship for their cruise. As they sail away, they spy Goofy sitting at the dock, fishing.

July 31

July 31, 1982 – The Television Special Pluto and His Friends Premieres

On July 31, 1982, the 30-minute television special Pluto and His Friends premiered on CBS. It was a shortened version of the Disneyland Anthology Series episode “Pluto’s Day,” and featured four Pluto-centric animated short films: Canine Caddy (released 1941), Bubble Bee (released 1949), Food for Feudin’ (released 1950), and The Simple Things (released 1953). The special was narrated by Gary Owens.

June 19

June 19, 2015 – The Pixar Short Film Lava Premieres in Theaters

“I have a dream I hope will come true, that you’re here with me and I’m here with you.”

On June 19, 2015, the animated short film Lava premiered in theaters alongside the animated feature film Inside Out. Written and directed by James Ford Murphy, the 7-minute short film is a song sung by Kuana Torres Kahele and Napura Greig. The short is about a lonely volcano who watches all the wildlife couples around him and sings a song about his dream to find his mate. He sings every day, hoping somehow he will find love. After many years alone, the volcano is about to become extinct, unaware that an underground volcano has heard him the entire time and has fallen in love with him. She erupts to the surface, ready to meet him. As he has used up all of his lava, he is unable to sing his song to her; as she sings his song back, he is revived, and the two are joined together, singing about their “lava.”

June 10

June 10, 1958 – The People and Places Featurette Wales is Released to Theaters

On June 10, 1958, the People & Places Featurette Wales was released to theaters. It was the eleventh featurette in the series to be released, and was filmed in CinemaScope. Directed by Geoffrey Foot, the featurette takes a look at the country of Wales, including its rich history and folklore, along with its factories and natural resources.

April 20

April 20, 1946 – The Animated Feature Film Make Mine Music Premieres in New York City

“Make mine music and my heart will sing.”

On April 20, 1946, the 8th animated feature film Make Mind Music premiered in New York City. The film was one of the package films that were released during the wartime period; as resources were diverted to training and propaganda films, making a full-length animated feature was impossible. It was decided that, to make much-needed income for the studio, shorter segments would be made and compiled into a feature film. The film featured what Walt affectionately called “ghost stars,” as the voices in the film were well-known stars who were not seen on film, but usually featured in a narration role. The film was eventually released nationwide on August 15, 1946.