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Tag Archives: Live Action

August 12

August 12, 1958 – The True-Life Adventure White Wilderness Premieres in Theaters

“Every species had to adapt itself to the bitter cold, or perish.”

On August 12, 1958, the thirteenth True-Life Adventure featurette, titled White Wilderness, was released to theaters. It would go on to win the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. It was directed by James Algar and filmed primarily in Canada. It took a team of several photographers three years to gather enough footage in the Arctic to create the film, creating a story about the struggle between predatory beasts and migratory animals. This film is also notorious for its “lemming scene,” where a mass of lemmings are seen leaping into the Arctic Ocean; however, lemmings do not commit mass suicide, and the scene was eventually uncovered as staged.

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August 10

August 10, 1960 – The True-Life Adventure Jungle Cat is Generally Released

“[The jungle cat’s] secret domain is the scene of our True-Life Adventure, and its predatory habits our theme, for this is the story of the greatest hunter of them all.”

On August 10, 1960, the final True-Life Adventure documentary was generally released to theaters, after having an initial release on December 16, 1959. Directed by James Algar, the film explores the story of the South American jaguar as narrated by Winston Hibler. A pair of jaguars start a family, fight off their natural enemies (such as a crocodile and a boa constrictor), and hunt for food in the South American jungle.

July 26

July 26, 2012 – The Series Disney Code: 9 Premieres on Disney Channel

“Mom and Dad just got here, we’re at code: 9.”

On July 26, 2012, the live-action television series Disney Code: 9 premiered on Disney Channel. It was a prank show where kids would pull elaborate, high-tech pranks on their unsuspecting parents. It was the second version of a prank show on Disney Channel, with the first being PrankStars in 2011. Disney Code: 9 was a short lived show, ending on September 28, 2012, after airing only six episodes.

July 24

July 24, 2009 – Disney’s Christmas Train Arrives at Union Station

Disney’s A Christmas Carol is a thrilling, multi-sensory movie directed by Robert Zemeckis that takes the classic Dickens tale to the big screen like never before.”

On July 24, 2009, Disney’s A Christmas Carol Train Tour arrived at Union Station in Chicago, Illinois. Sponsored by Hewlett Packard and Amtrak, and promoting the upcoming film A Christmas Carol, the train was scheduled to stop in 40 cities through 36 states, ranging from New Mexico to New York. The train also gave guests a sneak peek at the movie, with a glimpse at the character designs and cutting-edge technology.

July 9

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July 9, 1958 – The People and Places Featurette Ama Girls is Released to Theaters

On July 9, 1958, the 13th People and Places Featurette, Ama Girls, was released to theaters. Directed by Ben Sharpsteen, the featurette explores the life of a family of fishers in Japan, particularly the eldest daughter who is an ama diver, or pearl diver; the women in this film also dive for a mineral-rich seaweed known as “heaven grass.”. The film is also released as Japan Harvests the Sea. It would go on to win the Academy Award for Best Documentary Short Subject at the 31st Academy Awards.

July 5

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July 5, 1994 – The Soundtrack for Angels in the Outfield is Released Through Hollywood Records

On July 5, 1994, the soundtrack for the live action feature film Angels in the Outfield was released through Hollywood Records (a part of the Walt Disney Music Group). Composed by Randy Edelman, the soundtrack features a 15-piece score.

June 11

June 11, 1958 – The People & Places Featurette Scotland Premieres

On June 11, 1958, the twelfth People & Places featurette Scotland premiered in theaters. Filmed in CinemaScope, this 25-minute featurette explores the three distinct regions of Scotland: the highlands, the islands, and the lowlands. This featurette also looked at the various clans of the regions, the wildlife, and how history is celebrated at the Edinburgh Festival. It was directed by Geoffrey Foot.