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Tag Archives: Television

August 11

August 11, 1991 – The Television Documentary Queen: The Days of Our Lives Premieres

“An informative and sometimes tragic look into the lives of four childhood friends that would come to form the band Queen.”

On August 11, 1991, the television special Queen: The Days of Our Lives premiered on television. Directe by Rudi Dolezal and Hannes Rossacher, and hosted by Guns And Roses front man Axl Rose, the documentary is a 90-minute look at the lives of the band members and how they formed the group Queen. It featured interviews with the members of the band, as well as special concert footage and behind-the-scenes clips. This documentary was especially poignant, as lead singer Freddie Mercury would pass away a few months later on November 24th.

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August 8

August 8, 2001 – The Wayne Brady Show Premieres on ABC

“Anyway, I think you get the spoof here. It’s the Wayne Brady Show, premiering Wednesday on ABC.”

On August 8, 2001, the musical variety show The Wayne Brady Show premiered on ABC. Featuring comedian Wayne Brady as host, the show had special guests performing improvisational skits alongside selected audience members. Cast members included Brooke Dillman, Jonathan Magnum, J.P. Manoux, and Missi Pyle. The show lasted only a few episodes, ending on September 19, 2001.

July 26

July 26, 2012 – The Series Disney Code: 9 Premieres on Disney Channel

“Mom and Dad just got here, we’re at code: 9.”

On July 26, 2012, the live-action television series Disney Code: 9 premiered on Disney Channel. It was a prank show where kids would pull elaborate, high-tech pranks on their unsuspecting parents. It was the second version of a prank show on Disney Channel, with the first being PrankStars in 2011. Disney Code: 9 was a short lived show, ending on September 28, 2012, after airing only six episodes.

May 26

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May 26, 2006 – The Tony Danza Show Ends

“I’m Tony Danza and I’m in New York City, live!”

On May 26, 2006, the daytime talk show The Tony Danza Show ended its run on television. Beginning on September 13, 2004, and distributed by Buena Vista Television, the show was hosted by actor Tony Danza and recorded at the ABC studio complex. Its most well-known gimmick was a game called “Extravadanza,” which was a Plinko-style game that was played with a home viewer. The series ran for only two seasons before it was cancelled due to low ratings.

May 23

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May 23, 1982 – The Television Special Computers Are People, Too! Premieres

“Computers – they’re everywhere! There’s no escaping them, no matter who you are.”

On May 23, 1982, the television special Computers Are People, Too! premiered. Created as promotional tool for the live action feature film Tron, the feature sought to not only soothe the public’s fears that they would be displaced by computers and robots, but to show how people would work with machines peacefully. It was directed by Denis Sanders, and starred Elaine Joyce, Joseph Campanella, and Michael Iceberg.

The special begins with Elaine Joyce playing a computer game while other computer systems work around her. She loses her game, and the computer bets her “double or nothing” to play again. She wonders if she, as a singer, dancer, and actress, will be replaced by computers and machines. The main computer reminds her that computers are people as well, and simulates a juggler. Joyce then introduces the computer of the future: Telecommunicative Operative Memory, or TOM for short. TOM explains that he is an extension of a person’s intelligence, and on the verge of a partnership with several types of people, such as artists and athletes. He provides several examples of machine meeting art, including several clips from the upcoming film Tron. Joyce wonders how to work with TOM if she doesn’t know how the computer thinks. She panics, thinking that the computer will take over, but TOM reminds her that she has the control. TOM interviews several people about computers, and introduces a special summer camp in California that teaches campers how to use and code on a computer.

An early example of how computer animation was created using dancers hooked up to machines.

TOM then introduces how animation is done with computers, with the earliest example going back to Lee Harrison in 1960, with dancers wired to computers to capture the motion. He then goes through the advancements over the decades, and explains how we are then at 3-D animation. The consensus from artists is that computers will not replace creativity, but enhance it. Another animator relays the story of his search for a design machine, and then realized that he would have to create it. TOM then shows the graphical designs by the computer in a long, colorful segment. The segment then moves into how the computer can create special sound effects, or even create a “one-man band” through the use of a synthesizer known as the Fairlight CMI.

As Joyce remarks that she has the freedom to move TOM doesn’t because she is a dancer, TOM remarks that the computer has made advances in human understanding of human movement. The engineer talks about the difference between different types of athletic events and movements, ranging from dancing to diving. The engineers use the computer to look at the styles of two dancers and to determine the dancers’ centers of gravity. They see a flaw in one of the dancers’ takeoff and advise her how to correct it. After seeing this, Joyce thinks that her career as an artist is over due to technology. TOM informs her that he is powerless without her, and need her creativity. TOM then explains that computer games are the first foray into using computers, and shows several titles such as Pac-Man and Frogger. The segment also shows how computers created the look of Tron and its several games. Joyce finally accepts that the computer is the partner of the artist, rather than the adversary. The special ends with Joyce dancing alongside a computer animated counterpart.

May 9

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May 9, 1984 – The Television Special Disney’s All-Star Mother’s Day Album Premieres on CBS

“What makes mothers all that they are? Might as well ask what makes a star…”

On May 9, 1984, the television special Disney’s All-Star Mother’s Day Album premiered on CBS; this was a compilation of several clips from the Disney catalog about mothers, ranging from the animated short films to clips from Bambi, Dumbo, and Peter Pan.

April 24

April 24, 1989 – The Serial Teen Angel Premieres on the Mickey Mouse Club

On April 24, 1989, the serial Teen Angel premiered on the 1989 reboot of the Mickey Mouse Club. Similar to the serials of the original program (such as Annette and Spin and Marty), this was a limited serial that aired only twelve episodes. It told the story of Buzz Gunderson, who had been killed in a car crash in 1959 and brought back as a guardian angel. Buzz is tasked to help hapless Dennis Mullen through various tasks that, when completed, will allow him to get into heaven. The series starred Jason Priestly as Buzz, Adam Biesk as Dennis Mullen, and Renee O’Connor as Nancy Nichols. The series was popular enough to warrant a sequel serial called Teen Angel Returns.