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Tag Archives: Emmy Award Nominated

July 6

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July 6, 2006 – High School Musical is Nominated for Six Primetime Emmy Awards

On July 6, 2006, the nominations for the 58th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards were announced. The Disney Channel Original Movie High School Musical was awarded with six nominations: Outstanding Choreography (for Kenny Ortega, Charles Klapow, and Bonnie Story); Outstanding Children’s Program (for Don Schain, Bill Borden, and Barry Rosenbush); Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie, or a Special (for Kenny Ortega); Outstanding Casting for a Miniseries, Movie, or a Special (for Jason La Padura and Natalie Hart); Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics (for “Get’cha Head in the Game”), and Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics (for “Breaking Free”). The television movie would eventually win two of these awards: Outstanding Choreography, and Outstanding Children’s Program.

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May 21

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May 21, 1999 – Bill Nye the Science Guy Wins Four Daytime Emmy Awards

“Science rules.”

On May 21, 1999, the 26th Daytime Emmy Awards were held at The Theater in Madison Square Garden, New York City. At this ceremony, the science program Bill Nye the Science Guy walked away with four awards: Outstanding Sound Editing, Outstanding Single-Camera Editing, Outstanding Directing for a Children’s Series, and Outstanding Children’s Series. This would be the first year that the show would win Outstanding Children’s Series, and would win it again in 2000.

May 16

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May 16, 2003 – The Animated Series Teacher’s Pet Wins Daytime Emmy Award

“He’s so over just being Rover.”

On May 16, 2003, the 30th Daytime Emmy Awards were held at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. At this ceremony, the animated television series Teacher’s Pet, which was part of ABC’s One Saturday Morning programming block, ended up winning an award for Outstanding Special Class Animated Program, its second and final win in this category. The show won against Static Shock, Madeline: My Fair Madeline, Ozzy & Drix, and Rolie Polie Olie.

March 17

March 17, 1956 – Disneyland Anthology Series Wins Two Emmys

Walt Disney Emmy

“Walt Disney Presents…”

On March 17, 1956, the 8th Primetime Emmy Awards were held in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles, California. The Disney Anthology series, then known as Disneyland walked away with two Emmy awards: one for Best Action or Adventure Series, and one or Best Producer for a Film Series, awarded to Walt Disney. The Best Action or Adventure Series award was undoubtedly won for the popular “Davy Crockett” featurettes on the show, which had swept the nation; the episode “Davy Crockett and the River Pirates” had gone on to be nominated as Best Single Program of the Year (though it lost to “Peter Pan” from Producers’ Showcase).

January 10

January 10, 1988 – The Animated Series The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh Premieres on Disney Channel

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“He’s round and he’s fuzzy, I love him because he’s just Pooh Bear, Winnie the Pooh Bear, looking for fun, chasing some honey bees.”

On January 10, 1988, the animated series The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh premiered on the Disney Channel. It ran for four seasons, with 50 episodes in total. It would go on to win the Emmy Award for Best Daytime Animated Program twice, once in 1989 and once in 1990. The series starred Jim Cummings as Winnie the Pooh, Paul Winchell as Tigger, John Fiedler as Piglet, Ken Sansom as Rabbit, Hal Smith as Owl, Peter Cullen as Eyeore, Michael Hough as Gopher, Tim Hoskins as Christopher Robin, Nicholas Melody as Roo, and Patty Parris as Kanga.

The first episode, “Pooh Oughta Be in Pictures,” begins on a dark and stormy night in a gloomy castle, with the characters of the Hundred Acre Wood being chased through the dark halls. It turns out that Christopher Robin has just been imagining things while avoiding eating his carrots. After eating the carrots, he’s allowed to go see a scary movie called Birdzilla, scaring Piglet before they even go in. Piglet gets so terrified that he knocks over almost everything in sight as he tries to flee, including Christopher Robin, who is laden down with snacks. Piglet jumps into Pooh’s lap after seeing a scary spider in the film, causing Pooh’s candy to drop to the floor. As Pooh and Piglet search for the candy, Piglet gets caught in a web of gum, believing it to be from the spider. Unfortunately, as Pooh tries to free Piglet, the two get caught in the gum until Christopher Robin frees them. Piglet continues to be terrified by everything in the movie theater. Tigger and everyone try to cheer Piglet up with a song about how the monsters aren’t real.

The movie's parts are assigned, with Pooh playing the hero, and Tigger playing the monster

The movie’s parts are assigned, with Pooh playing the hero, and Tigger playing the monster

The next day, everyone talks about the film, and Christopher Robin proposes that they all make their own monster movie. Pooh will be playing the hero thanks to a hero scarf, while Tigger will play the monster. Piglet would rather sit out, but the gang convinces him that his role is very, very important: he will be the one chased by the monster. Tigger heads off to get his costume – a giant carrot – and heads back to the group. Rabbit is in his garden, pulling out his carrots, when Tigger stops by. Rabbit is terrified of the “giant carrot,” and thinks that the carrot is going to attack him and has eaten Tigger. Unfortunately, Tigger can’t undo the costume’s zipper and prove that he’s just Tigger, but when he asks for help, Rabbit has already fled. Rabbit then enters the movie set and screams that he’s seen a monster, and when Tigger arrives, everyone else runs away, thinking the monster is real. Tigger chases them through the woods, but the group stops running after a while, thinking they should try and save Tigger from the giant carrot.

Pooh comes up with a plan, and when Tigger arrives, the plan goes awry due to fear, but Tigger is able to break free after he falls in the hole. Rabbit is beyond relieved to find that it’s just a costume. Piglet walks away, dejected, sad that he was too scared to help the others, especially Pooh, and claims that no one needs a friend who’s always afraid. That night, Piglet is still upset, but is surprised when Pooh stops by to visit with a present: the hero scarf. Piglet refuses, as he still thinks Pooh shouldn’t be friends with a fraidy-cat. Pooh leaves the scarf behind, and heads off to get advice from Christopher Robin, when he gets caught up in the costume and calls out for help. Seeing the hero scarf, Piglet decides to go and save Pooh. Piglet crashes down a hill, but manages to save Pooh. The next day, when making the film, Piglet now gets to play the hero, while Pooh plays the one getting chased.

December 8

December 8, 2009 – The Animated Christmas Special Prep & Landing Premieres on ABC

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“The operation has its challenges, but we’re always prepared.”

On December 8, 2009, the animated Christmas special Prep & Landing premiered on ABC. It was based on a story idea by director Chris Williams, who would go on to direct Bolt. The short met positive reviews, and ended up winning an Emmy Award for Outstanding Animated Program. The short was written and directed by Kevin Deters and Stevie Wermers-Skelton. It starred Dave Foley as Wayne, Derek Richardson as Lanny, Sarah Chalke as Magee, and W. Morgan Sheppard as Santa.

The story begins on Christmas Eve, where two elves are preparing a living room for Christmas day festivities, using special night-vision googles and other technical devices to ensure everything is perfect for when Santa arrives. The elves, named Wayne and Peterson, are part of the Prep and Landing team. Wayne has been doing this for a long, long time, and he’s ready for a change: a promotion to Director of Naughty List Intelligence, to be exact. Unfortunately, he didn’t get the promotion, but his old partner got it. He tries to put on a brave face when told the news, but he is actually rather hurt that his partner got noticed over him. Wayne then gets a new partner named Lanny, whose cheerful disposition is not exactly comforting to Wayne. As the pair head out to start Prep and Landing work, they meet Thrasher, cousin to reindeer Dasher, and Thrasher threatens Lanny, as he prefers to be thought of as a myth.

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Lanny and Wayne head out to their job, with Wayne barely making any moves in doing his work

The elves are let out over their first stop, and as Wayne doesn’t wish to do his job anymore, he convinces Lanny to do the job himself while he lounges in the living room. Poor Lanny continues to make one mistake after another, and Wayne doesn’t notice that the kid in the house has woken up. The kid takes Wayne’s picture, and all Wayne can do is stare. Meanwhile, back at the North Pole, Santa has just left the building, ready to deliver presents all over the world. In the house, the boy named Timmy, grabs Wayne and asks questions until Lanny is able to stun Timmy and put him to sleep. Wayne decides they should just head out, but Lanny points out that protocol says that all children need to be “snug in their beds.” As they carry Timmy back to his room, Lanny asks Wayne if something’s wrong. Wayne answers that he’s been working Prep and Landing for 227 years, and he can’t find the joy in it anymore. When Wayne continues to act sour, Lanny sadly admits that he thought Wayne was the Prep and Landing guy, but Wayne is just a lump of coal. Things get worse when Magee, the North Pole Christmas Eve Command Center Coordinator, finds out that the pair aren’t ready for Santa’s arrival, and initiates plan “Figgy Pudding,” eliciting a gasp from others in the NPCECC. This means that Timmy’s house is skipped for Christmas.

When Wayne finds out that Timmy is being skipped, he realizes that it’s all his fault, and is even more upset when Timmy thanks Wayne in his sleep. Wishing to make it right, Wayne is patched through to Santa, and convinces Santa to turn back around. He and Lanny then head to the roof to set up the roof, but they lose their landing lights. They head to a nearby neighbor’s light display, and rig it to mark the way for Santa. The two manage to work together to create a safe landing for Santa, saving Christmas. The next day, Wayne goes to visit Santa to apologize for what had happened. Santa then gives Wayne a present to see how well Timmy is doing on Christmas. As he leaves Santa’s office, he tells Lanny that he was granted a promotion to Director of the Nice List, but turned it down to stay in Prep and Landing with Lanny.

October 16

October 16, 1925 – Actress and Disney Legend Angela Lansbury is Born

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“Oddly enough, children recognize my voice. They’ll hear me and say, “Mom, that’s Mrs. Potts!” It’s the timbre of my voice that they pick up on.”

On October 16, 1925, Angela Brigid Lansbury was born in Regent’s Park, London, England to actress Moyna MacGill and politician Edgar Lansbury. Her talent manifested at the age of nine, when she took to playing characters as a way to cope with her father’s death of stomach cancer. She immersed herself in film, and in 1940, she began studying acting at the Webber Douglas School of Singing and Dramatic Art; her formal education was cut short by the Blitz, where she and her family immigrated to the United States, ending up in New York City. While there, Lansbury gained a scholarship to study at the Feagin School of Drama and Radio. In 1944, she got her big Hollywood break when she was cast as the maid in the film Gaslight, which not only scored her a contract with MGM, but an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. The following year would see another Academy Award nomination for Lansbury after her work in The Picture of Dorian Gray, and a third nomination would occur in 1962 for her role in The Manchurian Candidate.

Lansbury is better known for her roles on the stage, beginning with her debut in 1957 in the short-lived Hotel Paradiso. Her first musical was Stephen Sondheim and Arthur Laurents’ Anyone Can Whistle, which closed after 9 performances. This was followed with Mame in 1966, where she was cast as lead Mame Dennis. Lansbury not only gained near universal praise for her performance, but received her first of five Tony Awards for the role. She would then win Tony Awards for her roles in Dear World (1969), Gypsy (1975), Sweeney Todd (1979), and Blithe Spirit (2009). Despite this success, Lansbury is probably best known for her role as writer and amateur sleuth Jessica Fletcher in the long-running television series Murder, She Wrote. For her role, she was nominated for twelve Emmy awards.

Lansbury’s association with Disney began in 1971, when she was cast as the lead character Eglantine Price in Bedknobs and Broomsticks. She would go on to be nominated for a Golden Globe for this role. Her second main role with the studio came in the 1990s, where she voiced the role of Mrs. Potts in Beauty and the Beast, and sang the title song, which would go on to win an Academy Award. In 2006, she would also be featured as a host in Fantasia 2000, introducing “The Firebird Suite.” Known as a Disney icon to children everywhere, she was inducted as a Disney Legend in 1995. Among her numerous other awards and honors, Lansbury was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2014.