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Tag Archives: Short film

April 20

April 20, 2010 – Pixar Canada Opens in Vancouver

“Located in beautiful Vancouver BC, Pixar Canada’s mission is to produce animated shorts and television specials, featuring characters from Pixar’s prior films.”

On April 20, 2010, the animation studio Pixar Canada opened in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The studio, an offshoot of Pixar Animation Studios in Emeryville, California, was created to focus on Pixar’s short films, including Partysaurus Rex and Small Fry. The idea was to let this studio create the short films that would be packaged with Pixar films, or used in the Disney parks as a way to entertain guests during long wait times. Unfortunately, after only three years, Pixar closed down the studio to focus on its main studio in Emeryville, laying off close to 100 employees. However, Pixar’s interest in opening in Vancouver led to other animation studios setting up their own branch studios there.

April 18

April 18, 1927 – The Alice Comedy Alice’s Circus Daze Premieres in Theatres

On April 18, 1927, the Alice Comedy Alice’s Circus Daze was released to theaters. It was the 48th Alice Comedy produced, and the first to feature fourth and final Alice actress Lois Hardwick.

It’s a fun day at the circus, with the animals preparing for the show. There are plenty of sideshow attractions, including a rubber man. Meanwhile, Alice and Julius are preparing for their act while the circus begins its main show. There’s a mouse that rides a bicycle while riding an elephant, an adept jaguar tamer, and a lion tamer who comically loses his head. Finally, Alice and Julius present their high wire act, where Julius balances a stack of chairs, and Alice, on his nose. Unfortunately, as he shows off by lighting a cigarette, he sets the wire on fire, and the chairs come crashing down one by one, though Julius is able to save Alice with a ladder. The pair lands on the ringmaster, who chases them out of the tent.

April 4

April 4, 1927 – The Alice Comedy Alice’s Auto Race is Released to Theaters

On April 4, 1927, the Alice Comedy Alice’s Auto Race premiered in theaters. It was the 47th Alice Comedy produced, and the 31st to star second Alice actress Margie Gay. The short has since become classified as a lost film.

April 2

April 2, 1928 – The Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Short Film Sagebrush Sadie is Released to Theaters

On April 12, 1928, the Oswald the Lucky Rabbit short film Sagebrush Sadie premiered in theaters. Although the film is considered a lost film, some scenes in pencil drawings from the film survive in the Walt Disney Animation Research Library. The short was animated by Ub Iwerks, Hugh Harman, and Rollin Hamilton.

 

March 25

March 25, 1954 – Walt Disney Wins Four Academy Awards

On March 25, 1954, the 26th Academy Awards were held at the RKO Pantages Theatre in Hollywood, California. Walt Disney set a record at this awards ceremony by winning four awards, becoming the most Oscars won in the same year; this record has yet to be broken as of 2017. The awards Disney won include Best Animated Short Film for Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom; Best Documentary Feature for The Living Desert; Best Documentary Short for The Alaskan Eskimo; and Best Live Action Short Film, Two-Reel for Bear Country.

March 7

March 7, 1927 – The Alice Comedy Alice the Collegiate is Released to Theaters

On March 7, 1927, the Alice Comedy Alice the Collegiate premiered in theaters. It was the 45th Alice Comedy created, and the 29th to star second Alice actress Margie Gay. It has since been classified as a lost film.

March 4

March 4, 1943 – Der Fuehrer’s Face Wins Academy Award

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“We heil! Heil! Right in der Fuehrer’s face!”

On March 4, 1943, the 15th Academy Awards were held at the Coconut Grove in Los Angeles, California. The Disney propaganda short film Der Fuehrer’s Face won the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, beating out the likes of All Out for V, Blitz Wolf, Juke Box Jamboree, Pigs in a Polka, and Tulips Shall Grow. Most of the shorts in this category, including Der Fuehrer’s Face, ridiculed the brainwashing tactics of Nazism and were very anti-German, save for Pigs in a Polka, which parodied Disney’s Three Little Pigs and Fantasia. The song for Der Fuehrer’s Face, written by studio composer Oliver Wallace, also proved to be very popular after it was recorded by Spike Jones and His City Slickers.