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January 26

January 26, 1990 – The Educational Film The Brain and the Nervous System Think Science is Released

“Cerebrum here! Thinking, movement, judgement, problem solving, no problem!”

On January 26, 1990, the educational short film The Brain and the Nervous System Think Science was released as part of the Wonders of Life Series. The eleven-minute film teaches quickly about the functions of the main three parts of the brain. It was written by Jamie Simons and directed by Lina Shanklin, with animation directed by Bob Kurtz.

The film begins with a greeting by Captain Cortex in Cranium Command before he leads them on a tour of the brain, looking at the cerebrum, the cerebellum, and the brain stem in animated forms. The audience is then taken to a classroom, where a girl named Jessica is fretting over a note she has received from the principal. Her friend Fred inquires what she’s done, but she’s not sure. Another student named Sylvester grabs the note and reads it out loud, informing her that it’s not good. Their teacher comes in and begins their lesson on the brain and the nervous system. Jessica is still distracted from the note, but manages to answer questions on what the cerebrum does. Sylvester is asked about the cerebellum, but is unable to answer, and Fred throws something at him to make a point about how the cerebellum handles balance and coordination. The teacher continues with the brain stem, and then moves into how the brain works with the spinal cord. Jessica finally leaves for her meeting with the principal, her brain working on overload as she walks the hallway. The principal informs her that her project at the science fair won first place, and she will be given an award at a future assembly. She wonders if everyone will think she’s a brain, and when the principal inquires if she is, she smiles, as the pieces of her brain add, “and proud of it, too!”

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August 10

August 10, 1989 – The Educational Film Trains is Released

“Gawrsh, I was hoping to meet some of the people who work on this here railroad.”

On August 10, 1989, the second of three educational films in the Goofy’s Field Trips series, titled Trains, was released. It features Bill Farmer as the voice of Goofy.

The short begins at the Rio Grande Train Station, where two kids, Cindy and Peter, are bombarding Peter’s father with questions. Peter’s father asks the kids to wait while he buys the tickets, and as they go to sit down, they spy Goofy in the station, singing to himself. He greets them, and the three magically disappear from the station and reappear near an Amtrak train. They are greeted by the engineer, who explains his job and some logistics of the train and tracks. He then has them meet Sherry, the Chief of Onboard Services, who explains her job before she takes them aboard the train. She introduces several types of rooms, including the dining car. As Peter looks through a book, Sherry explains the different types of trains he spies in his book. She takes them to meet the conductor, who quickly explains his role before the train takes off. The kids and Goofy then are whisked away to the freight yard, where they see a variety of freight trains and meet the yard master. He points out the different kinds of freight trains, which carry different kinds of supplies. He also describes the differences of the trains of old, and the new computerized systems of the time. Afterwards, they head to the dispatch center to learn about the process of dispatching the trains, with the computers helping make sure the trains are doing what they want them to do. The kids then reappear in the main terminal, and head out to their train with Peter’s father. As they pull out of the station, they spy Goofy waving goodbye from the platform.

August 7

August 7, 1989 – The Educational Film Ships is Released

“I was hopin’ to see that big ship. I wanna learn all about ships.”

On August 7, 1989, the first of three educational films in the Goofy’s Field Trips series, titled Ships, was released. It featured Bill Farmer as the voice of Goofy.

The short begins at the Starship Atlantic, which has just begun to board. Two kids are asking a lot of questions about the ship, when they spy Goofy. Magically, the trio are whisked away to the dock, where they meet the cruise director. Brought inside, the cruise director explains her job of coordinating activities for the passengers while showing them around the ship. She also explains the names of the front, back, and sides of the ship. She then takes them to the galley to meet the ship’s cook, who explains he has to cook for over 2,000 people. They meet the captain, who shows the group the radar system, and explains how he works with the ship’s engineers. The group also learns about how the lines keep the ship in place, and how the ship will take off from the shore. The cruise director takes the group to the radio room, where the ship keeps in communication with the shore, the Coast Guard, and other important parties. The group gets a message from Mickey Mouse, telling them to check out the rest of the harbor. Magically they are whisked away to the harbor, where they meet the harbor master. The group learns about all the types of ships in the harbor, and meet the berthing officer. The kids then end up back with their family, and board the ship for their cruise. As they sail away, they spy Goofy sitting at the dock, fishing.

July 27

July 27, 1989 – The Educational Film The United Nations is Released

“Do you see…Mickey Mouse?”

On July 27, 1989, the fourth and final film in the Mickey’s Field Trip series, The United Nations, was released under the Epcot Educational Media label. This 16 minute film gave viewers a chance to take a look at The United Nations complex in New York City.

The film opens with two children walking through New York City, arguing over what they should go see, when they come across Mickey Mouse, who offers a solution: a trip to the United Nations complex. There, they meet Mickey’s friend Kiki from Ghana, who is also a UN guide. Mickey is no stranger to the UN, as he is recognized by the organization as an emissary of goodwill to the children of the world. They view the flags of the countries that are members of the UN before they head inside. Kiki also explains that once they enter the complex, they are in an international zone, which doesn’t belong to one single country. The group then meets other members of the UN to discuss the role of the organization, how they handle conflict, the role of the Security Council, and how they prevent fighting across the world. The group also goes over the roles of the interpreters, who do their best to communicate with the members of the Security Council, before moving to the General Assembly. The group is greeted by the children of the world and act out the voting process for the issues facing the world. The episode ends with the kids ringing the peace bell, hoping that one day there will be world peace.

August 13

August 13, 1945 – The Educational Film Tuberculosis is Delivered

On August 13, 1945, the educational film Tuberculosis was delivered to the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. The Disney Studios had a series of “good neighbor” films during World War II that stressed the importance of cleanliness and other issues that affected areas of South America; this film was one of the first in a series addressing health concerns and the steps that need to be taken to cure someone of the disease. Though an English version was produced, the film was created entirely in Spanish.

May 15

Posted on

May 15, 1998 – Bill Nye Wins Daytime Emmy

Bill Nye displays his Emmy statuette during the1998 Daytime Emmy Awards at Radio City Music Hall in New York on Friday, May 15, 1998. Nye won for "Outstanding Performer in a Children's Series" for his role in "Bill Nye the Science Guy." (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

“Science Rules!”

On May 15, 1998, the 25th Daytime Emmy Awards were held at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. The science program Bill Nye the Science Guy, distributed by Disney, won five Emmy awards, including one for Bill Nye as Outstanding Performer in a Children’s Series. The series also won for Outstanding Writing in a Children’s Series, Outstanding Sound Editing, Outstanding Sound Mixing, and Outstanding Single Camera Editing. This was the second win for several of these categories, and the first for Nye as Outstanding Performer; the series would go on to win Outstanding Children’s Series the following year.

July 27

July 27, 1989 – The Educational Short Film The United Nations is Released

MFT

On July 27, 1989, the short educational film The United Nations was released. Part of the Mickey’s Field Trip series, the live action short had Mickey Mouse guide two children through the United Nations, where they meet several guides from various countries. As the children tour the General Assembly, the Security Council, and UNICEF, they learn about world health, the skills behind translating for the delegates, and how to solve conflicts.