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Tag Archives: Academy Award winning

March 21

March 21, 1956 – Men Against the Arctic Wins Academy Award

On March 21, 1956, the 28th Academy Awards were held at the RKO Pantages Theater in Hollywood, California. At this ceremony, Disney’s People and Places documentary featurette won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Short Subject, winning against MGM’s The Battle of Gettysburg and The Face of Lincoln. This was the second People and Places featurette to win an Academy Award.

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February 27

February 27, 1935 – The Tortoise and the Hare Wins Academy Award

On February 27, 1935, the 7th Academy Awards were held at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California. The short film The Tortoise and the Hare won the Academy Award for Best Short Subject, Cartoon, beating out Holiday Land by Screen Gems and Jolly Little Elves by Walter Lantz. This was Disney’s third win in the category since its founding in 1934; Disney would dominate this category until 1940.

April 29

April 29, 1989 – Who Framed Roger Rabbit Wins Four Academy Awards

“But I’m a toon. Toons are supposed to make people laugh.”

On April 29, 1989, the 61st Academy Awards were held at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California. The combination live-action animation film Who Framed Roger Rabbit was nominated for six competitive awards, and managed to score three: Best Film Editing, Best Sound Effects Editing, and Best Visual Effects. The film was also given a special achievement award for the film’s animation director Richard Williams. This was the second animated film to be awarded multiple Academy Awards, with Mary Poppins having been the first.

March 30

March 30, 1992 – Beauty and the Beast Wins Two Academy Awards

“Tale as old as time, song as old as rhyme, Beauty and the Beast.”

On March 30, 1992, the 64th Academy Awards were held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California. Nominated for six Academy Awards, including a history-making first time nomination for an animated feature film, Beauty and the Beast managed to score two awards in the music categories: Best Original Score, and Best Original Song. Three songs from the film were nominated for Best Original Song: “Belle,” “Be Our Guest,” and the winner, “Beauty and the Beast.” The film won against “When You’re Alone” from Hook and “(Everything I Do) I Do It For You” from Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. The score was the winner against scores from Bugsy, The Fisher King, The Prince of Tides, and JFK.

March 26

March 26, 2000 – “You’ll Be in My Heart” Wins Academy Award

“You’ll be here in my heart, always.”

On March 26, 2000, the 72nd Academy Awards were held at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California. Recording artist Phil Collins managed to walk away with a win for Best Original Song for the song “You’ll Be in My Heart” from the Disney animated film Tarzan; this was the film’s only nomination and win. The song won against “Blame Canada” from South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut; “Music of My Heart” from Music of the Heart; “Save Me” from Magnolia; and “When She Loved Me” from Toy Story 2.

March 25

March 25, 1954 – Walt Disney Wins Four Academy Awards

On March 25, 1954, the 26th Academy Awards were held at the RKO Pantages Theatre in Hollywood, California. Walt Disney set a record at this awards ceremony by winning four awards, becoming the most Oscars won in the same year; this record has yet to be broken as of 2017. The awards Disney won include Best Animated Short Film for Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom; Best Documentary Feature for The Living Desert; Best Documentary Short for The Alaskan Eskimo; and Best Live Action Short Film, Two-Reel for Bear Country.

March 4

March 4, 1943 – Der Fuehrer’s Face Wins Academy Award

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“We heil! Heil! Right in der Fuehrer’s face!”

On March 4, 1943, the 15th Academy Awards were held at the Coconut Grove in Los Angeles, California. The Disney propaganda short film Der Fuehrer’s Face won the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, beating out the likes of All Out for V, Blitz Wolf, Juke Box Jamboree, Pigs in a Polka, and Tulips Shall Grow. Most of the shorts in this category, including Der Fuehrer’s Face, ridiculed the brainwashing tactics of Nazism and were very anti-German, save for Pigs in a Polka, which parodied Disney’s Three Little Pigs and Fantasia. The song for Der Fuehrer’s Face, written by studio composer Oliver Wallace, also proved to be very popular after it was recorded by Spike Jones and His City Slickers.