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Tag Archives: Animated Feature Film

June 8

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June 8, 1993 – The Soundtrack for Snow white and the Seven Dwarfs is Released on CD for the First Time

“Though your teeth are out, and your whiskers sprout, and your arches give away, you’re never too old to be young and gay.”

On June 8, 1993, the soundtrack for Disney’s animated feature film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was released for the first time on compact disc (CD). It featured the entire score and songs from the film, as well as two songs that were created for the film but inevitably cut from the final production: “Music in Your Soup” and “You’re Never Too Old to Be Young.”

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May 29

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May 29, 1998 – Disney Places Mulan Merchandise in Disney Stores

“From Disney’s 36th animated feature, Mulan, comes an all new musical masterpiece that will capture the emotion and adventure of this compelling film.”

On May 29, 1998, to promote the upcoming animated feature film Mulan, Disney Stores released special merchandise inspired by the film. Pieces ranged from costumes, to plush toys of characters such as Mushu, to dolls of the titular character. The film would go on to be released on June 5, 1998.

May 9

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May 9, 1984 – The Television Special Disney’s All-Star Mother’s Day Album Premieres on CBS

“What makes mothers all that they are? Might as well ask what makes a star…”

On May 9, 1984, the television special Disney’s All-Star Mother’s Day Album premiered on CBS; this was a compilation of several clips from the Disney catalog about mothers, ranging from the animated short films to clips from Bambi, Dumbo, and Peter Pan.

May 2

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May 2, 1938 – The New York Times Publishes Editorial on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

“Figments of Disney’s imagination have already sold more than $2,000,000 worth of toys since the first of the year.”

On May 2, 1938, the New York Times published a special editorial on Walt Disney and the success of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, titled “Prosperity Out of Fantasy.” This editorial piece looked to Disney’s brand of “industrialized fantasy” to save the United States economy, as the country was still in the throes of the Great Depression. However, while the success of Snow White wasn’t the driving force in saving the economy, the editorial was notable in seeing the effects of Disney’s full-length feature film, which became the model for building a profitable and long-lasting film franchise.

April 2

April 2, 1899 – Sound and Camera Pioneer and Disney Legend Bill Garity is Born

“With his pioneering efforts in sound and camera techniques, he helped set Disney Studios apart from others, while his planning and supervisory expertise resulted in the building of a highly efficient Studio in Burbank.” – Disney Chief Archivist Emeritus, Dave Smith

On April 2, 1899, Bill Garity was born in Brooklyn, New York. After attending the Pratt Institute of Art in New York, he served with the Radio Research and Development sector of the U.S. Signal Corps during World War I. His work in radio continued to flourish when, after the war, he met and worked with Lee DeForest, a pioneer in the field of radio. The pair would work on the development of sound for the earliest films. As Garity was working on the Cinephone motion picture recording system in 1928, he met a young Walt Disney, who was hoping to elevate the animated art form. With Garity’s help, Steamboat Willie became a hit for the fledgling Disney Studios, and Disney bought the Cinephone system with an offer for Garity to come out to Hollywood to install it and train a technician to operate it. Garity officially joined the Walt Disney Studios in 1929 and stayed with the company for over 13 years, leading a department of 18 engineers. At Disney, Garity was instrumental in creating such innovations such as the multiplane camera, which earned the studio an Academy Award in the Scientific and Technical category; the team also invented Fantasound, a unique stereo system that was installed in theaters specifically for the animated feature film Fantasia. Garity left the studio in 1940 to pursue other technical ventures, and ended up serving as the vice president and production manager for the Walter Lantz Studios. He passed away on September 16, 1971, in Los Angeles California. For his groundbreaking technical expertise and ability to help Walt achieve his dream of the elevated animated film, Garity was posthumously honored as a Disney Legend in 1999.

April 1

April 1, 1978 – The First Disney Films are Shown on Pay-TV

On April 1, 1978, the first Disney films were shown through pay-TV services, and served as a precursor to what would become the Disney Channel. Disney had been interested in creating their own cable channel since 1977, but instead made a deal with HBO to air several pieces from the Disney catalog. The idea for the Disney Channel was revived in 1981, and would finally launch in April 18, 1983.

March 7

March 7, 2010 – Up Wins Two Academy Awards

“Boy, never did I dream that making a flip book out of my third grade math book would lead to this.”

On March 7, 2010, the 82nd Academy Awards were held at the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles, California. Nominated for five awards, Pixar’s animated feature film Up walked away with two: Best Animated Feature, and Best Original Score. It was the second animated feature film to ever be nominated for Best Picture, but lost out to The Hurt Locker. For animated feature films, it won against Coraline, Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Princess and the Frog, and The Secret of Kells.