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Tag Archives: 1970s

March 22

March 22, 1975 – The Store Posh Pets Opens in Lake Buena Vista Village

Image credit: d23.com

On March 22, 1975, the specialty pet store Posh Pets opened in the Lake Buena Vista Village shopping area of Walt Disney World. The shop not only sold accessories and had grooming appointments, but also sold unique and exotic live animals, such as varieties of fish, parrots, and albino skunks. The store closed on October 9, 1976, and was quickly replaced by Toys Fantastique.

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March 14

March 14, 1975 – The Magic Carpet ‘Round the World Film Attraction Closes in Walt Disney World

On March 14, 1975, the film attraction Magic Carpet ‘Round the World, located in the Tomorrowland Circle-Vision Theatre, officially closed. Open since March 16, 1974, the 360-degree film gave guests majestic views of some of the world’s most beautiful places. After it was closed, it was replaced by an updated version of the attraction’s predecessor, America the Beautiful. The film would be revived in Tokyo Disneyland, opening on April 15, 1983, and closing on May 16, 1986.

March 2

March 2, 1976 – Walt Disney World Welcomes 50-Millionth Guest

On March 2, 1976, Walt Disney World welcomed its 50-millionth guest to the park. 13-year-old Susan Brummer from Virginia was the lucky guest welcomed in. This was quite a feat for the park, as it had only been open under five years. Tourism continued to grow for the parks at this stage, as new attractions and resort locations were added every year to keep interest high. The 100-millionth guest would arrive at the park only three years later.

January 9

January 9, 1977 – The New Mousketeers Perform at Super Bowl XI

“Ladies and gentlemen, the entire audience of Super Bowl XI presents from the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, a greeting to the world of peace, joy, and love.”

On January 9, 1977, Super Bowl XI was held at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. This halftime show was produced by Disney, and was used to promote the revamp of the Mickey Mouse Club by featuring the New Mousketeers performing alongside the LAUSD All-City Band. The presentation centered around the theme of the it’s a small world attraction, including the themes of “peace, joy, and love.” For the first time in a halftime show, the audience of the game was invited to participate through the waving of colored placards.

December 29

December 29, 1974 – John Lennon Signs Papers at Walt Disney World Dissolving The Beatles

On December 29, 1974, it is widely believed that John Lennon, who was staying on vacation at Walt Disney World’s Polynesian Resort, signed the paperwork that effectively dissolved the partnership of the band the Beatles. Although the rest of the band had signed the papers at Apple Headquarters, Lennon had been a no-show at the meeting, and instead had gone to celebrate Christmas at Walt Disney World with his secretary and lover May Pang.

November 25

November 25, 1971 – The Circarama Film America the Beautiful Begins Showing in Walt Disney World

“She is a rich land, and a rare land. A fresh, and fair, land.”

On November 25, 1971, the 360 degree film (known technically as a Circarama film) America the Beautiful began showing in Walt Disney World’s Tomorrowland. It originally was shown at the Brussels World’s Fair in 1958, and was brought to Disneyland in 1960; it was reshot a few times, including once for America’s Bicentennial celebrations, and it eventually closed in Disneyland on January 3, 1984, and was replaced by American Journeys. The original Walt Disney World showing of the film lasted until March 15, 1974; it was brought back on March 15, 1975, and lasted until September 9, 1984.

November 21

November 21, 1978 – The Library of Congress Holds the Exhibit Building a Better Mouse

“…a ground-breaking popular culture exhibition on display at the Library…”

On November 21, 1978, the exhibition Building a Better Mouse kicked off at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Running until January 30, 1979, the exhibit celebrated Mickey Mouse’s 50th birthday as well as “fifty years of animation,” as it was advertised. It was curated by animation historian J. Michael Barrier, and featured over 120 items, ranging from production art, to merchandise, to books; these items were from a variety of sources, including the Disney Archives and materials already in the hands of the Library of Congress.