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Tag Archives: Annie Awards

November 16

November 16, 1997 – Hercules Wins Four Annie Awards

On November 16, 1997, the 25th Annie Awards were held at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California. At this ceremony, the Disney animated feature film Hercules walked away with four wins out of six nominations, winning for Best Achievement in Directing for Ron Clements and John Musker; Best Achievement in Producing for Alice Dewey, Ron Clements, and John Musker; Best Achievement in Effects Animation, and Best Achievement in Character Animation. While nominated for Best Animated Feature, the film lost out to Turner Feature Animation’s Cats Don’t Dance. Disney also scored a win for Aladdin and the King of Thieves as Best Animated Video Production.

February 11

February 11, 2007 – Disney Animator Andreas Deja Wins Winsor McCay Award

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“It’s fine to have a villain who beats people up and is ruthless, but the more important thing for me is whether or not they are interesting. The villains who have full personalities are the ones you remember.”

On February 11, 207, the 34th Annie Awards were held at the Alex Theatre in Glendale, California. One of the honorees of the Winsor McCay Award was Disney animator Andreas Deja. The award, named after pioneer animator Winsor McCay, honors those who have made lifetime or career contributions to the animation field. Deja is known for animating some of the most well-regarded villains in the Disney Renaissance, including Gaston from Beauty and the Beast, Jafar in Aladdin, and Scar in The Lion King. With this award, Deja joins the ranks of esteemed animators Max Fleischer, Tex Avery, and early mentor Eric Larson.

January 31

January 31, 2015 – Disney Wins Twelve Awards at the 42nd Annie Awards

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“This was a terrific night with something for everyone. It was fun to take a look back at our history, celebrate and honor what we have accomplished over the past year, and even look forward a little to what is in store for 2015 and beyond.” – ASIFA-Hollywood Executive Director Frank Gladstone

On January 31, 2015, the 42nd Annie Awards were held at the University of California, Los Angeles’s Royce Hall. Out of 38 nominations – many in the same category – Disney was awarded eleven awards, and one special achievement award for the Walt Disney Family Museum. Disney’s 54th animated feature Big Hero 6 was given 7 nominations, winning one for Animated Effects in an Animated Production. The short film Feast was awarded as the Best Animated Short Subject, while Gravity Falls was awarded as Best Animated TV/Broadcast Production for Children’s Audience. Disney Television Animation did very well at the awards, with Wander Over Yonder winning two and the Mickey Mouse short films winning six. The Walt Disney Family Museum won the Special Achievement Award for “recognizing the unique and significant impact on the art and industry of animation.”

November 13

November 13, 1998 – Mulan Wins Ten Annie Awards

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“You’ll bring honor to us all.”

On November 13, 1998, the 26th Annie Awards were held in Glendale, California in the historic Alex Theater. Out of twelve nominations (with one category having three nominees), the Disney animated feature film Mulan walked away with ten awards, including Outstanding Achievement in an Animated Theatrical Feature, edging out Fox Animation Studios’ Anastasia, Bill Plympton’s I Married a Strange Person, and Warner Bros. Feature Animation Quest for Camelot. Other awards included:

  • Outstanding Individual Achievement for Character Animation
  • Outstanding Individual Achievement for Effects Animation
  • Outstanding Individual Achievement for Production Design in an Animated Feature Production
  • Outstanding Individual Achievement for Storyboarding in an Animated Feature Production
  • Outstanding Individual Achievement for Writing in an Animated Feature Production
  • Outstanding Individual Achievement for Voice Acting by a Female Performer in an Animated Feature Production
  • Outstanding Individual Achievement for Music in an Animated Feature Production
  • Outstanding Individual Achievement for Directing in an Animated Feature Production
  • Outstanding Individual Achievement for Producing in an Animated Feature Production

February 7

February 7, 2004 – Pixar’s Finding Nemo Wins Nine Annie Awards

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“Sweeping all nine categories it was nominated in, the Disney/Pixar collaboration Finding Nemo proved to be the big winner at the 31st annual Annie Awards.”

On February 7, 2004, the 31st Annie Awards were held at the Alex Theater in Glendale, California. In all nine categories it was nominated, Pixar’s Finding Nemo took home the award, including the one for Best Animated Feature, beating out Warner Brothers’ Looney Toons: Back in Action, Les Armateurs’ Les Triplettes de Belleville, Go Fish Pictures’ Sennen Joyuu, and Walt Disney Feature Animation’s Brother Bear. Finding Nemo was also awarded for Character Animation (awarded to animator Doug Sweetland), Character Design in an Animated Feature Production (awarded to animator Ricky Nierva), Directing in an Animated Feature Production (awarded to Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich), Effects Animation (awarded to Martin Nguyen), Music in an Animated Feature Production (awarded to Thomas Newman), Production Design in an Animated Feature Production (awarded to Ralph Eggleston), Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production (awarded to Ellen DeGeneres), and Writing in an Animated Feature Production (awarded to Andrew Stanton, Bob Peterson, and Dave Reynolds); the short film Boundin’ also won an award for Outstanding Achievement in an Animated Short Subject.

December 1

December 1, 2008 – Bolt and Wall-E Receive Nominations for the 36th Annie Awards

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Bolt was second [in nominations] with 9 nods, and WALL-E third with 8.”

On December 1, 2008, the nominations for the 36th Annie Awards were announced; Walt Disney Animation Studios’ Bolt received 9 nominations, while Pixar’s WALL-E received 8. Both films were nominated for Best Animated Feature, up against DreamWorks Animation’s Kung Fu Panda, Sherman Pictures and Lama Films’ $9.99, and Sony Pictures’ Waltz With Bashir. When the awards took place on January 30, 2009, the ceremony was not without controversy, as Kung Fu Panda shut out both Disney features from all of their categories, with much criticism directed at the organization’s balloting practices. Pixar’s WALL-E would go on to win the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.