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April 1

April 1, 1938 – The Silly Symphony Moth and the Flame is Released to Theaters

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On April 1, 1938, the Silly Symphony Moth and the Flame was released to theaters. It was directed by Burt Gillett.

A lamp outside “Ye Olde Costume Shoppe” has attracted a swarm of moths who dance around the light. A pair lands on the windowsill and peer into the shop, thinking of the clothes inside as a massive feast. They find a way in and begin to eat, but unexpectedly attract the attention of the other moths, who quickly dive in and devour every piece of clothing in sight.

One young moth couple has a romantic date near a feathered hat, sharing a kiss. The girl tries to get the boy to chase her, and is rather put out when he decides to eat a bowler instead. Nearby, a flame on a candle spies the moth and laughs, then begins to dance, moving the girl moth’s shadow around and catching her attention. He draws her closer, and she dances dangerously close to the flame, burning the candle down to practically nothing. The flame jumps around, following her, and she puts him out with a fire insurance policy. However, he burns right through it and continues his pursuit, until she is stuck in a spider’s web.

The boy moth tries desperately to free his girlfriend, with the flame always close behind

The boy moth tries desperately to free his girlfriend, with the flame always close behind

The boy moth, seeing her in trouble, runs to her rescue, but is quickly chased away by the flame. He then uses a nearby glass of water to douse the flame, but is unsuccessful, then accidentally uses the highly flammable benzene, which gives the flame greater strength. Finally, he gathers the attention of all the other moths, who use a bagpipe filled with water to bring the flame down. Using other instruments in the shop, they work to quickly kill the flame, and the boy is able to free the girl. Together again, the two share a kiss.

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